Sunday, November 30, 2008

Hopi Prophecy

A friend of mine online posted about this prophecy. I'm not normally one to repeat such things, but this seemed... important. And so I share it with you.

“You have been telling the people that this is the Eleventh Hour.
Now you must go back and tell the people that this is the Hour.
And there are things to be considered:
Where are you living? What are you doing?
What are your relationships? Are you in right relation?
Where is your water? Know your garden.
It is time to speak your Truth.
Create your community.
Be good to each other.
And do not look outside yourself for the leader.
This could be a good time!
There is a river flowing now very fast.
It is so great and swift that there are those who will be afraid.
They will try to hold on to the shore.
They will feel they are being torn apart, and they will suffer greatly.
Know the river has its destination.
The elders say we must let go of the shore, push off into the middle of
the river, keep our eyes open, and our heads above the water.
See who is in there with you and celebrate.
At this time in history, we are to take nothing personally.
Least of all, ourselves.
For the moment that we do, our spiritual growth and journey comes to a
halt. The time of the lone wolf is over. Gather yourselves!
Banish the word struggle from your attitude and your vocabulary.
All that we do now must be done in a sacred manner and in celebration.
We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.”

–The Elders, Oraibi, Arizona Hopi Nation

Wow. The river has been rushing past me for months. I have been terrified by the storm of it. I have fought against it, and I have become exhausted with trying to hold onto the shore. The whole family has dealt with death and medical problems and moving and job loss and many other issues. Yet, I can answer the questions, confidently, without fear.

And there are things to be considered:
Where are you living? What are you doing?
What are your relationships? Are you in right relation?
Where is your water?


We are living in New Hampshire, on the land we just purchased. Money is tight, yes, but we can make it. We know that now. We are learning how to live here, in concert with our neighbors and with the land itself. We are learning how to appease the wights here, how to learn from the spirits that live within the earth and water that surrounds us. We have relationships with each other, in various combinations and as a whole. We have relationships with our neighbors, our friends, and our community as a whole. For the first time in a long, LONG time, we are feeling as if we are in right relations. At first, we sought to purchase land that was far away, remote from the world, where prying eyes would leave us alone. Not so, now that we're here. We're a part of this community, and we are considered contributing members. People know us, wave to us, smile at us, and we smile and wave back. We make coffee for the people splitting wood across the street. People ask to hunt on our land, and offer pieces of the meat in return for the favor. People here have shown us that there are still places that one can be a part of the world, rather than apart from the world. And where is our water? It's right outside, of course. The Connecticut River runs almost through our backyard, and we have many springs and ponds on our property. We have a well right outside our back door. We have water that comes to us regardless of whether power is supplied to our home or not. We are no longer dependent upon "the grid," although we enjoy its services when they are available.

Know your garden.
It is time to speak your Truth.
Create your community.
Be good to each other.
And do not look outside yourself for the leader.
This could be a good time!


We haven't planted our garden yet, but we know where it's going, and what is going to be in it. We know where our orchard will be in a few years' time. We are speaking our truth, to all who can hear it, but in the place where we live we are preaching to the choir. Boy, is that ever NICE. We came here to create our own community, only to find that our community was already created, and we were accepted into it with open arms. And this community that we now belong to also respects our family community, and is polite enough to not ask awkward questions. We are our own leaders, and each of us in our family is good at something. Farnham leads at gardening, Amo at woodworking, sis at quilting, me at homestead cooking, and Missus at herbs and animal husbandry (despite her allergies!). Each of us leads when it is appropriate, and steps back when someone else is more knowledgeable. Isn't that how it's supposed to be?

At this time in history, we are to take nothing personally.
Least of all, ourselves.


Um... yeah, wow. I need to hear this. Daily. I might just print it out on a ream of paper and paste it around my room. Sometimes, I take myself too damn seriously. We all do, on occasion. We must learn to let go of that, myself foremost. I think, too, this refers to we as a people even more than "we" as a family or community. America is a wonderful country, amazing in its growth, its strength, its ability to change and adapt. But America has also become prideful, and takes many things personally. That's a very dangerous thing...

Banish the word struggle from your attitude and your vocabulary.
All that we do now must be done in a sacred manner and in celebration.

Yes, struggle is so difficult. It's what wears us down. It's what wears ME down. When I manage to bend and wave, like the willow tree, I'm not damaged by the storms that go past. I might be achey but I always survive unscathed. It's when I stand tall and prideful like the oak that things become painful, damaging, and struggle-filled.

Can I celebrate the work I have to do on a daily basis? Can I celebrate the ache in my shoulders as I go to bed? I think I can, though I have much to learn before it comes easily. Sometimes, it's a matter of gritting my teeth and gasping out my acquiescence to the celebration going on around me, rather than full blown celebration. But even that is a beginning.

For me, doing things in a sacred manner has always been so important. The times when I fall down in my spiritual practices (like the past month), everything crumbles around me. My head spins with crazy ideas, and my heart leads me in wrong places. That daily quiet nod to Hestia and Hecate, to Dionysos and Aesculapius, are of massive importance to my life. Hera and Zeus bless my "married" life, and Nyx... well, she touches me. I need to give back.


Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Things get better, day by day

Life can be really tough sometimes. We've been through a lot in creating our new home in New Hampshire. We've gone through living with friends and being essentially homeless. We've dealt with deep debt, Amo losing his job, and sis working 2 hours from home every day. We've put up with dwindling meat supplies and staples.

It's getting better, though. Amo is out hunting deer for our larder, so meat won't be a problem anymore. Last night, our friend C told us about a wonderful grocery store that had inexpensive things, so we went and filled the shelves with beans and lentils and soup and such. I got corn meal and flour, and stuff to make our Thanksgiving feast. We even got two turkeys! It was pretty impressive, looking at them all and picking out two 20+ pounders.

Everything is just starting to feel better. I am hoping that the worst of the emotional and financial stuff is done with. We have enough seeds to get by, come spring, although we'll probably buy some, too. It's all improving, day by day, and I'm thrilled.